Monthly Archives: October 2014

How are YOU preparing for NaNoWriMo?

November is coming! (Already? Dammit!).

I’m working with some other social media websites, and I wrote something on Storify about how to prepare for NaNoWriMo:

https://storify.com/pshoffman/na-no-wri-mo-and-why-you-should

Told you it was a short post!

How are YOU preparing for NaNoWriMo? What are you going to write? Are you READY?

Comment below, and don’t forget to like and follow the blog!

Photo by Rudolf Vlček

10,000 Words a DAY?! (or How to Use Science to Write More, Better)

The most Novembery of all months is bearing down on us, and soon everyone around the world will be getting to work on novels they’ve been putting off for far too long. Authors will be completing first drafts of novels in November, because who wants to go outside in **the weather**?

Wait. Novel first drafts in a month? How is that possible? That’s like, 5000 words a day, without deleting anything.

If you had asked me 6 months ago, I would have said “That’s impossible.” But I’ve been working up there (I think I’m at around 2000 words on a good day), and if you asked me a few hours ago, I’d say “That’s improbable. Only full-time writers can even get close to that.”

Continue reading 10,000 Words a DAY?! (or How to Use Science to Write More, Better)

Books Too Difficult? Why You Should Read Them Anyway!

I read this article and my brain flopped out of my gaping mouth.

The article picks apart some recent statements by bestselling novelist Nick Hornby, and his suggestion that readers should not force themselves to read difficult books. Hornby says, “Novels should be like TV. It shouldn’t be hard work and we should do ourselves a favour.”

OK, before I get passionate and start ranting, I want to say this: TV can be thought-provoking, immersive and emotionally powerful. TV can be fantastic.

And there is nothing wrong with authors writing easy-to-read books; sometimes you just want to curl up after a long, hard day and relax.

But to prescribe that all books should be easy, that all books should be nothing but popcorn entertainment — this is evil.

 

Continue reading Books Too Difficult? Why You Should Read Them Anyway!

How Much Do You Sell For?

This article in The New York Times bemoans the issues of being a writer; namely, not being paid. The author, Tim Kreider, addresses the frequency of people asking him to write for free. Sickening, isn’t it?

Kreider ends his tirade by pleading with all writers to never, ever, ever give out their writing for free. He says, “Do it for your colleagues, your fellow artists, because if we all consistently say no they might, eventually, take the hint.”

But if you’re a self-publisher, or a self-marketer of any kind, maybe you should not heed his advice.

I want to point to this post from The Creative Penn.

It’s an interview with  full-time, independent author Lindsay Buroker. Buroker gives away the first book in The Emperor’s Edge series for free, and sells the rest for $4.95.

You know what? It’s working for her. And she isn’t the only one who advocates this type of marketing. According to this interview (Thanks Lindsey!), Neil Gaiman experimented with giving away one of his books free for a month, and his sales went up by 300% the following month.

So I wanted to ask you, dear writers: Do you sell your work? How much do you sell for? Do you know how other authors do it?

Post your thoughts in the comments below! Don’t forget to like or follow.

Photo Credit: TaxCredits.net

Writers, are you having trouble with productivity? Read this.

WAKE UP. 

Every day you don’t write, another innocent story dies. How could you, you heartless monster.

Who knows how much is lost because you put off writing.

Again.

The number one problem with writers is that we’re lazy, and we’ll never get anything done unless we discipline ourselves.  If you want to be a successful author, you will have to write everyday, sometimes for hours.

But how do you do that? How do you find the time, the discipline to do that?

Here are 65 authors to answer these questions and more:

http://www.focusalot.com/blog/accomplished-writers/

Remember: If you don’t write your stories, someone else will.

 

Follow, like, comment, and go write!

(Image by Araí Moleri Riva-Zucchelli via Flickr Creative Commons)